The Church and Ethnic Jews

14 Jun

I love history, especially history about Ancient Roman architecture and construction. Great Britain is soaked in Ancient Roman history in terms of its structures and buildings. If I were to locate a marvellous Roman excavation and replace it with a modern building, I’m sure many historians, organisations and even government would be horrified at my dishonour and arrogance. The new building that I constructed has written off hundreds of years of history, society and great importance to the formation of contemporary Great Britain. The better option would be to restore it to be all it was created to be.

This is similar to the Church and ethnic Israel’s position. The Jewish people have great history and importance. Paul describes many of their attributes in Romans 9 as follows: ‘theirs is the adoption to sonship; theirs the divine glory, the covenants, the receiving of the law, the temple worship and the promises. Theirs are the patriarchs, and from them is traced the human ancestry of the Messiah’.

If the Church were to come along and say, ‘we don’t need any of that, we are now the new chosen people of God, and in fact we don’t even need to consider our history or founders of our faith’ then we would be committing a great crime, being arrogant and dishonouring. God would not be happy. Rather, the people of the Messiah (the Church) must honour and not write off their heritage, history and foundations. The architecture God used in the form of Israel to bring about his redeeming purposes for his people in Christ is highly significant and must be preserved. Not only must this history be preserved, but our attitude towards the ethnic Jews of our day must also be of honour and respect. We should not be arrogant, as Paul describes in Romans 11, toward the Jewish people, ‘If some of the branches have been broken off, and you, though a wild olive shoot, have been grafted in among the others and now share in the nourishing sap from the olive root, do not consider yourself to be superior to those other branches.’ The gentiles have been grafted into Christ (the olive tree) along with believing Jews to form the church. However, just because we have been grafted in to God’s family does not mean we are better or superior to the branches that are not currently part of his family (unbelieving Jews).

Using the analogy above (though not perfect), we might say that God is in fact restoring the ancient building (rather than replacing it) under new management, namely the Messiah. The new restored part of the building (God’s family through the Messiah) should not say ‘I am a new building, better than the old one that used to exist’. Rather it should say ‘I honour the previous existing building and desire it to be renewed to the requirements of the manager’. The new restored part of the ancient building is fulfilling its destiny to be the building the architect desired it to be.

In summary:

1/ the church must recognise, honour and respect its Jewish foundations and history ensuring it is preserved and understood

2/ the church must not be arrogant toward unbelieving Jews who are not yet part of God’s family, thinking of itself as more superior

3/ the church’s desire should be for God to restore humanity (Jew and Gentile) into a commonwealth through the Messiah to be all it was designed to be

What do you think? Let me know

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